Case Study

Independent Data Verification of the Payment by Results Scheme in the Rural Water Sub-sector in Tanzania

Client: Department for International Development (DFID) | Sectors: Natural Resources

Since August 2018, Ecorys have been delivering the Independent Data Verification of the Payment by Results Scheme in the Rural Water Sub-sector in Tanzania, funded by DFID (2018-2022).

The programme supports the access of Tanzania’s rural population to water supply by implementing an innovative payment approach which incentivises improved service delivery. Local Government Authorities (LGAs) gather data and report each month on the number and functionality status of water points in their district. Ecorys then complete independent verification of this data, including desk-based, telephone and field-based spot checks. The results of these checks are then reported to DFID, and the accuracy of the data, as well as the number of functional water points found, is used to calculate a payment disbursement to the LGAs. Funds are then used to improve the service provision of water points to urban and rural communities across Tanzania.

The programme also has a large learning component, focussing on assessing how successfully the payment modality ensures improvements to delivery of improved water services. Lessons are fed back into verification procedures, wider programme implementation, as well as to the wider water sector.

This will enhance the resilience and long term sustainability of rural water supply in Tanzania and will feed into Tanzania’s National Development Vision 2025, which strives to provide a minimum of 90% of the country’s rural popular with water supply services (and provide universal access to water supply service in urban areas) by 2025.

This programme is in its early phases, and will incentivise improvements in LGA reporting and sustainability of water points, through providing data verification and payment for functioning water points. It will evaluate the sustainability of new water point construction to measure likely future sustainability, with a view to ultimately incentivise good quality water point construction.

This programme has a large learning component, focussing on assessing how successfully the payment modality ensures improvements to delivery of improved water services. Lessons are fed back into verification procedures, wider progamme implementation, as well as to the wider water sector. This will provide clear, practical recommendations on how data systems could be further strengthened and improved.

Key Experts

Amy Weaving Senior Consultant